Chanterelle Mushroom Toast

Updated: Jul 19

When the humid, rainy days of June start rolling in at the Homestead, David and I start to get giddy for one thing: mushroom foraging. And of all the fungi out in the forest, one calls more loudly to his heart than all the rest: the chanterelle. To our delight, the Land provides abundant amounts of these beauties. So much so that we’ve named one of our hiking trails the “Chantrail.”


Besides making tasty dishes for ourselves, like homemade chanterelle and venison salami pizza or vegetarian spaghetti (squash), we LOVE sharing the chanterelle gospel with folks at the local farmers markets where we set up. In one line, we typically describe these mushrooms as, “Buttery with a hint of apricot, replacing the hefty substance of chicken in any dish.”


Buttery with a hint of apricot, replacing the hefty substance of chicken in any dish.

Recently, we shared some of our find at the Foothills Heritage Market with a pair of loyal, local customers who we suspect may be bona fide foodies. 😉 And guess what? They shared their recipe with us, and we want to share it with you.


Here’s a simple and tasty recipe that would be a great way for folks looking to just experience the flavor of chanterelles for the first time that they shared with me. Thanks for sharing, Amber!


The Recipe



👆🏼Here’s Amber’s version of the Adamant Kitchen’s Wild Mushroom Chanterelle Toast 😋 Check out the link to find the recipe she used. I highly recommend going to your local farmers market during June to find these tasty morsels, or to go looking in forested areas around you if you’re comfortable identifying them.


Top your fresh market sourdough, and savor this buttery slice of comfort. Kudo points if you’ve learned how to make your own sourdough during quarantine 🤩 (PS, hope you’re not on a diet!)

And, can I just say how much I adore that the Adamant Kitchen has a whole section dedicated to Wildcrafted Food and Drink?! 👏🏼


Always know 💯 what you’re picking before putting it in your mouth


Mushrooms often have look alikes who are not fun to play around with! If you’re buying from a forager, check to make sure they have their Mushroom Identification Certification and have labeled their packaging with their ID number and forage location.

I hope you enjoy this back to basics recipe as much as Amber and I did.

Did you make something delicious with Reid Homestead produce or products? Share your recipe with us!


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